Observatory

The South Florida Science Center & Aquarium's Newly Upgraded Observatory 

               

 

The NEW telescope in the observatory is an F/11 refractor. With a 10-inch lens weighing 35 pounds; the scope is 10 feet long and sits on a computerized mount resting on an adjustable pier that can move the scope up and down to accommodate our tallest and smallest guests. The telescope is one of the largest refractors in the state and is also equipped with a solar filter to view the sun during daylight hours and amazing optics for nighttime viewing of the planets, moon and other objects that come to life with it. The entire project which took 18 months to build, was designed by the Science Center staff and the Astronomical Society of the Palm Beaches.

More upgrades include a new weather station on the roof next to our observatory dome that was manufactured by Ambient. It provides real time temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, rainfall measurements and other weather-related information. It also has a camera that records the weather in real time for future study. Another new upgrade includes a large touch screen monitor in the observatory that allows us to change information on the screen with the touch of a finger. It also allows us to control the new telescope and gives our guests a chance to view what the telescope is seeing without having to look through the eyepiece.

The Observatory is open for night sky viewing on the last Friday of every month during Nights at the Museum and for solar viewing on select Saturdays. All viewing sessions are weather permitting.

Funding for this project was provided by the Marmot Foundation.

Our in-house Partners: 

Astronomical Society of the Palm Beaches

West Palm Beach Amateur Radio Group

The South Florida Science Center & Aquarium's Newly Upgraded Observatory 

               

 

The NEW telescope in the observatory is an F/11 refractor. With a 10-inch lens weighing 35 pounds; the scope is 10 feet long and sits on a computerized mount resting on an adjustable pier that can move the scope up and down to accommodate our tallest and smallest guests. The telescope is one of the largest refractors in the state and is also equipped with a solar filter to view the sun during daylight hours and amazing optics for nighttime viewing of the planets, moon and other objects that come to life with it. The entire project which took 18 months to build, was designed by the Science Center staff and the Astronomical Society of the Palm Beaches.

More upgrades include a new weather station on the roof next to our observatory dome that was manufactured by Ambient. It provides real time temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, rainfall measurements and other weather-related information. It also has a camera that records the weather in real time for future study. Another new upgrade includes a large touch screen monitor in the observatory that allows us to change information on the screen with the touch of a finger. It also allows us to control the new telescope and gives our guests a chance to view what the telescope is seeing without having to look through the eyepiece.

The Observatory is open for night sky viewing on the last Friday of every month during Nights at the Museum and for solar viewing on select Saturdays. All viewing sessions are weather permitting.

Funding for this project was provided by the Marmot Foundation.

Our in-house Partners: 

Astronomical Society of the Palm Beaches

West Palm Beach Amateur Radio Group